Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 05:41:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://grattage.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Painting scenery – Grattage http://grattage.info/ 32 32 Lawren Harris works top $7 million as ballroom bidding lights up Heffel House auction https://grattage.info/lawren-harris-works-top-7-million-as-ballroom-bidding-lights-up-heffel-house-auction/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/lawren-harris-works-top-7-million-as-ballroom-bidding-lights-up-heffel-house-auction/ [ad_1] Record auction of the Heffel House in Toronto totals more than $20 million Six major works by Lawrence Harris totaled an incredible $7.3 millionled by two masterpieces each surpassing $2 million Order the canvas by Marcelle Ferron broke the previous artist record, and by Andy Warhol iconic portrait of Queen Elizabeth II breaks the […]]]>

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  • Record auction of the Heffel House in Toronto totals more than $20 million
  • Six major works by Lawrence Harris totaled an incredible $7.3 millionled by two masterpieces each surpassing $2 million
  • Order the canvas by Marcelle Ferron broke the previous artist record, and by Andy Warhol iconic portrait of Queen Elizabeth II breaks the world record of published impressions for the artist

TORONTO, November 24, 2022 /CNW/ – Today in Torontoand in front of a global audience, a collection of monumental masterpieces has reached incredible heights at Heffel Fine Art Auction Househighly anticipated fall sale. The historic, record-breaking auction presented 87 works of art by renowned historical and contemporary artists to an eager market at the beautiful Park Hyatt hotel. Dazzling collectors and leading the charge were Lawren Harris, Andy Warhol, Marcelle Ferron and Thomas Thomson. Competition from passionate bidders who filled the crowded auction room, as well as remote participants on the phone and via Heffel’s digital auction room, drove the sale total to an extraordinary level. $20.8 million. (All prices are in Canadian dollars and include a buyer’s premium.)

Six works by Lawrence Harris captured the hearts of art lovers and collectors and led the Heffel House fall auction, totaling an exceptional price $7.3 million. His canvas of an optimistic urban landscape, House in the Neighborhood, Winter, Town Painting #1from a prestigious corporate collection, exceeded the $2 million Mark. Three extraordinary oil sketches by Harris, among the best ever to come to market, made their auction debuts this fall at the House of Heffel, and each one has done exceptionally well. From Lake Berg, evening, Arctic Sketch XV and Sketch of Lake Superior XI were acquired by the Lyle family in 1936, straight from Harris’ workshop, with the help of Harris’ son, and have been cared for by the family ever since. The sender of the works, who was seated in the front row of the auction room, was on the verge of tears as the hammer slammed into the last of the works and delivered a heartfelt “thank you” to the auctioneer.

“The passion and confidence of our bidders this season, many of whom were in the ballroom, was evident to all as attendees enthusiastically put out bids well above asking prices,” said Robert Heffel, vice-president of the Heffel art auction house. “We are honored to have presented so many phenomenal works by Canadian and international giants who will continue their journey into wonderful new homes.”

Fall 2022 Live Auction Highlights

  • canvases of Lawrence Harris are among the most sought-after works on the Canadian art market, and his blockbuster House in the Neighborhood, Winter, Town Painting #1 caught the eye this fall. At the top of the auction, the painting sold for $2,521,250 (is. $2,000,000 – 3,000,000).
  • Three radiant museum-quality paintings of Lawrence Harris were entrusted to the House of Heffel this fall by the descendants of John Lylethe architect behind Union Station and other iconic Toronto buildings. The superb Arctic Sketch XV sold at an exceptional price of $2,041,250 (is. $600,000 – 800,000), closely followed by From Lake Berg, evening who recovered $1,561,250 (is. $600,000 – 800,000) and Sketch of Lake Superior XI, which sold for $871,250 (is. $300,000 – 500,000).
  • A key piece by a female automatist painter Marcelle Ferron leads the Post-War and Contemporary Art Session and broke the auction record for his work. The striking masterpiece sold for $1,801,250 at the Heffel House autumn auction. A culmination of previews across the country, the 1962 canvas is truly museum quality (est. $200,000 – 300,000).
  • The crown jewel of the auction, by Andy Warhol coveted portrait of Queen Elizabeth II surpassed the $1 million mark and broke the world auction record for all Warhol editions ever sold at auction. The royal blue serigraphy of the ultra-rare Royal Edition, dazzling with diamond dust, sold for $1,141,250 (is. $500,000 – 600,000).
  • by Tom Thomson rare and important Moccasin Flower or Orchids, Algonquin Park once proudly belonged to Blair Laing, the legendary Canadian art dealer, and his family. The dramatic oil sketch, called a “national treasure” by the historian Joan Murraysold above its estimate for $1,501,250 (is. $1,000,000 – 1.5 million).
  • James Wilson Morrice ParisView from studio windowa major canvas and a magnificent example of early Canadian Impressionism sold for a remarkable price of $721,250 (is. $600,000 – 800 000).
  • Competing offers in the auction room and on the phone drove up the selling price of John Paul Lemieux Twelfth Night at $1,081,250. The spectacular large-scale canvas is among the artist’s most impressive works ever marketed (est. $600,000 – 800 000).
  • Outstanding examples from four important artists reached new heights at the fall auction. World auction records have been broken for Sybil Andrewsincluding the famous Speedway sold for $133,250 (is. $70,000 – 90,000), Regina Seiden with Market for $115,250 (is. $20,000 – 30,000) and Guillaume Perehudoff with Zephrus #2 for $157,250 (is. $30,000 – 50,000).

Maison Heffel is currently accepting consignments for the Spring 2023 auction season, including international works of art. The deadline for spring submissions is February 2023.

For more information on the works included in the House of Heffel Fall Live Auction, visit heffel.com.

About Heffel Fine Art Auction House
Since 1978, the House of Heffel has connected passionate collectors around the world with exceptional works of art, with sales totaling three quarters of a billion dollars. With offices at Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa and CalgaryHeffel has the most experienced team of fine art specialists in Canada and provides superior customer service to sellers and buyers internationally.

SOURCE Heffel Fine Art Auction House

For further information: To schedule an interview, or for images and a B-roll, please contact: Rebecca Rykiss, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, [email protected], 416-961-6505 ext. 323

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Sensorium Joins Music Leaders to Discuss Industry Landscape at XP Music Futures 2022 https://grattage.info/sensorium-joins-music-leaders-to-discuss-industry-landscape-at-xp-music-futures-2022/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/sensorium-joins-music-leaders-to-discuss-industry-landscape-at-xp-music-futures-2022/ [ad_1] ZUG, Swiss, November 24, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Deputy CEO and Creative Director of Sensorium, Sasha Tityanko will participate as a keynote speaker at the next XP Music Futureswhich will take place in Riyadh Between November 28-30. Considered the most forward-thinking gathering of music leaders held in the Middle EastXP Futures is a premier destination […]]]>

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ZUG, Swiss, November 24, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Deputy CEO and Creative Director of Sensorium, Sasha Tityanko will participate as a keynote speaker at the next XP Music Futureswhich will take place in Riyadh Between November 28-30.

Considered the most forward-thinking gathering of music leaders held in the Middle EastXP Futures is a premier destination for established music artists, producers, executives and icons as well as exciting new talent from around the world.

Sasha will deliver a keynote on “Music and Web3: How Artists and Virtual Beings are Changing the Game in the AI-Driven Metaverse” on November 29, alongside visual collective SVORA from Sensorium. During the conference, she will dig deeper and explore hot topics for the music industry, including the paradigm shift brought about by emerging technology, the potential of Web3, the role of AI in music creation and the opportunities opened up by the metaverse for performers, producers, and fans.

“This event is an opportunity for industry leaders to come together and discuss ways to improve the music ecosystem across the Middle East and beyond, while helping us identify the agents of change that will shape the future of the music landscape for years to come. As we experience a fundamental shift in the industry, with the increasing role of emerging technologies redrawing the boundaries of what can be done and experienced, I believe having this conversation now can have a massive impact,” notes Sasha Tityanko .

Additionally, Sasha will participate in a panel dedicated to exploring the issue of “Rave in the New World: Web3 and the Metaverse”.

XP Futures is hosted by MDLBEAST, the premier organization dedicated to improving the music and events industry in Saudi Arabia.

This year’s edition will welcome personalities such as the musical director and the artist manager Mathew KnowlesPalestinian-Chilean superstar Elyanna, artist, and Saudi Arabia first female DJ Cosmicat, among many others.

The conference sessions will run under the four vital blocks of XP which are Talent, Impact, Stage and Innovation.

“Sensorium unleashes the power of creative communities and elevates the world of music to the next level. By lowering physical barriers, Sensorium enables artists, fans and event organizers to come together in an endless world, setting the stage for the future of the music scene. For someone who has dedicated their life to working in music, it really feels like the future is now,” added Nour SaidA&R and Product Manager at MDLBEAST.

XP Futures also serves as a warm-up to MDLBEAST’s SOUNDSTORM festival (December 1-3), which has become one of the premier electronic music festivals in the world.

Last year, SOUNDSTORM welcomed over 730,000 attendees and in 2022 it will bring together over 150 world-renowned electronic music artists.

The festival program includes many Sensorium Galaxy’s Chosen such as Carl Cox, David Guetta, Eric Pridz, Steve Aokiand Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike.

As part of the festival’s efforts to expand across musical genres beyond EDM, organizers have brought in a number of crossover artists, including Post Malone, DJ Khaled, Chet Faker and Bruno Mars.

Sensorium’s participation in this series of events follows the company’s expansion efforts in the Middle Eastannounced last month plans to open a branch in dubai as the region provides a sustainable and supportive environment for metaverse businesses.

About Sensorium

Founded in 2018, Sensorium is a leading metaverse and Web3 developer, leveraging cutting-edge XR and AI technologies to deliver the next generation of virtual experiences in entertainment and beyond. The Company’s award-winning Sensorium Galaxy metaverse is one of the first platforms introducing global users to multi-sensory activities in virtual reality worlds, including music concerts, meditation sessions, original NFT content creation and social networking with AI-based virtual beings.

Sensorium is built on its long-standing collaboration with the world’s top technology partners and top artists, including David Guetta, Armin Van Buuren and Steve Aoki, to shape the future of Metaverse-ready events. In addition to powering high-end VR features, accessible through a wide range of interfaces, Sensorium is also pioneering blockchain and web3 solutions for institutional and private partners.

Website | SG website | SG Twitter | Twitter | SENSO telegram | Discord | SG Instagram | SG Facebook | LinkedIn | SG Youtube

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1955065/xp_music.jpg

SOURCESensorium


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New show from Tia Mowry: 6 painting and DIY projects to try https://grattage.info/new-show-from-tia-mowry-6-painting-and-diy-projects-to-try/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:04:39 +0000 https://grattage.info/new-show-from-tia-mowry-6-painting-and-diy-projects-to-try/ [ad_1] The original living room was too dark, almost like a cave. Giving homeowners a different paint color for their wet bar nook visually “carved out” a distinct new area in their space. “It also adds depth to an otherwise box-shaped piece,” Villemaire explains. “We have defined it as a special corner by activating it […]]]>

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The original living room was too dark, almost like a cave. Giving homeowners a different paint color for their wet bar nook visually “carved out” a distinct new area in their space. “It also adds depth to an otherwise box-shaped piece,” Villemaire explains. “We have defined it as a special corner by activating it as a real bar, a place of entertainment, abandoning its former purpose as a storage area.” The counter extension, handmade by locals, invited even more positive energy, not least because it was a project they were proud to do themselves.

Exterior mural for victory

Don’t let a blank canvas go to waste.

Photo: Tastemade/Lily Hernandez

What to do with an abandoned corner? Painting a fresco, sure. “Murals are one of the oldest and coolest forms of art produced by human civilization,” says Villemaire. “From the Sistine Chapel to Banksy street art, indoors and out, artists have taken advantage of large-scale canvases to express the human condition.” With the pandemic further propelling the trend of painting murals, these homeowners were inspired to draw a landscape inspired by their wedding theme, Sand and Sea. Villemaire balanced the tropical elements in the hot tub area with a desert mural. “We now have a 360-degree immersive experience,” she adds.

monochromatic muse

Variations of white bring new energy throughout the day.

Photo: Tastemade/Lily Hernandez

For a couple who craved a quiet touch, Silver decided to give the sunroom a minimalist vibe reminiscent of vacationing in Tulum. “A lot of people don’t realize that white doesn’t have to mean barren or drab, it can also mean soft and inviting,” she says. “We used a sandy white which had a slight hint of blush on the walls, and we used a neutral white on the fireplace which we then layered by sponging other browns on top to make it look more rustic.” The soothing space was actually a bit of an enigma of energy as the palette shifted between natural and artificial light.”During the day, the walls now act as a bright, invigorating element in which to work, and in the evening, the room is more like a haven of peace where you can relax by the fire,” says Silver.

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Eight Utah Art Spaces You Probably Didn’t Know About https://grattage.info/eight-utah-art-spaces-you-probably-didnt-know-about/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 23:03:54 +0000 https://grattage.info/eight-utah-art-spaces-you-probably-didnt-know-about/ [ad_1] Utah’s Mountain West State is known for many things, including world-class outdoor adventures, phenomenal vistas, and the cultural influence of the Mormon community. But Utah is also home to a thriving art scene, teeming with artist-run spaces, imaginative dual-purpose venues, and established galleries that support artists at every stage of their career, catching the […]]]>

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Utah’s Mountain West State is known for many things, including world-class outdoor adventures, phenomenal vistas, and the cultural influence of the Mormon community. But Utah is also home to a thriving art scene, teeming with artist-run spaces, imaginative dual-purpose venues, and established galleries that support artists at every stage of their career, catching the attention of locals and visitors alike. .

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Works by artist Andrew Alba hang in Vis Optics after an exhibition at Salon 801 (photo Roxanne Gray)

Lounge 801

Hosting a gallery from an eyewear store, in this case Vis Optics, might seem to work in theory only because vision is aligned with visual art. However, the exhibitions organized by the 801 Salon do not only appeal to the eyes. 801 Salon highlights a local visual artist each month and incorporates different elements such as dance, poetry and music. A recent showcase of the artist’s work Jill Whit began with a display of his quilted and airbrushed parachute tapestry and ended with a performance of his music. Exhibits remain on view at Vis Optics for approximately one month, allowing gallery visitors and shop patrons to experience the work.

801 Salon/Vis Optique (instagram.com/801.salon)
801 South 800 East, Salt Lake City, Utah


Bizarre Bazaar is considered Dreamscapes’ art shop (photo Bianca Velasquez)

Weird bazaar

Located next to the immersive interactive art installation dream landscapes, Bizarre Bazaar is a local gallery showcasing the works of Utah’s most eclectic and non-traditional artists. Created and supported by the Utah Arts Alliance (UAA), Bizarre Bazaar fulfills the UAA’s mission to create space for artists of all backgrounds and media and aims to increase exposure and opportunities for local artists through their platform. From large acrylic canvases to small robots handcrafted from recycled materials, Bizarre Bazaar keeps its collection mysterious and magical.

Bizarre Bazaar (utaharts.org)
10450 State Street, #2320, Sandy, Utah


Gallery 25 is one of Ogden’s oldest local art galleries (courtesy gallery)

Gallery 25

An intriguing Ogden staple, located on Utah’s charming and historic 25th Street, Gallery 25 is known as the oldest gallery in town and is a feature of the monthly Ogden Art Stroll. The gallery exhibits the works of its “owner artists” and “guest artists,” including the vibrant nature photographs of David J. Crowther, comical acrylic brown bears by Keith Dabb, and abstractions by Susan Jordan. A collective of artists offers portrait commissions and the gallery presents a different artist and their work each month.

Gallery 25 (gallery25utah.com)
268 Historic 25th Street, Ogden, Utah


As a community space, the Monarch hosts performances, events and Ogden Contemporary Arts (courtesy OCA)

The monarch

Located in a historic building in the Nine Rails Creative District in Ogden, Utah, the Monarch is home to Ogden Contemporary Arts (OCA) and has operated as an event space and creative studio since 2019. The Monarch also houses a studio for artists locals who display their work in the gallery, providing increased exposure through events and art walks. Perhaps the monarch’s most notable display within the OCA was The King’s Mouth, an immersive art experience created by Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips in 2021.

The monarch (themonarchogden.com)
455 25th Street, Ogden, Utah


The Moab Gallery offers an art space among the city’s infamous red rocks, with many works on display inspired by the surrounding landscape (courtesy Shari Michaud)

Moab Gallery

Moab attracts nature-loving tourists with its red rocks and scenic outdoor excursions, and downtown extends the adventure with lively bars, souvenir shops and the collaborative Gallery Moab. Aiming to foster Moab’s artistic community, the eponymous gallery hosts works by local painters, sculptors, photographers, and more. Antonio Savarese, whose oil paintings represent the red landscapes of Moab. At the more kitschy end of the spectrum is Michael Porter, which uses ceramic to transform images of vintage license plates into mug shapes. Whether visiting for landscape art or a souvenir, Moab Gallery captures work inspired by its striking hometown.

Moab Gallery (gallerymoab.com)
59 Main Street South, #1, Moab, Utah


Works from the JKR Gallery Annual Exhibition Fall Appearances exhibition (courtesy of the gallery)

JKR Gallery

The JKR Gallery regularly adds to the art scene in Provo, Utah, with art exhibitions organized under specific themes in one of two types: open calls and invitation-only. Previous shows such as Fall Appearances and the next God’s grace offer artists the opportunity to complete a piece under the thematic prompt, resulting in similar messages portrayed through various mediums and perspectives. Emerging and experienced artists participate in this tradition, giving visitors and locals something to look forward to month after month.

JKR Gallery (jkr-gallery.myshopify.com)
1675 North Freedom Boulevard, Unit 7B, Provo, Utah


Artists and visitors at Medium Studio, Salt Lake City’s new underground art center (courtesy Maru Quevedo)

Medium studio

Medium Studio brings culture, creativity and learning to Salt Lake City’s Sugar House neighborhood. By hosting events such as the Utah Black Business Market, Collaborative Jazz Nights, AAPI Events, and Pasifika Storytelling Events, Medium helps connect the city’s downtown community with diverse cultures and backgrounds. . With a focus on design, the Medium Gallery exhibits works such as the sullen cactusconcrete sculptures and pieces by local furniture designers like Alise Anderson and Emily Cates. Uniquely curated, Medium provides space for community growth and exploration.

Medium Studio (instagram.com/medium.slc)
2006 South 900 East Front, Salt Lake City, Utah


Urban Arts Gallery is a downtown Salt Lake City hotspot for local art (courtesy gallery)

Urban Arts Gallery

Urban Arts Gallery donated to Salt Lake City Gateway a breath of life when he made the mall his new home. Although the gallery is known for hosting works such as Scott Tuckfield’s psychedelic painting and annual submissions for their annual skateboarding challenge, it plays a much larger role in Salt Lake’s artist community. The space continues the love for local art by leading the gallery’s recurring walk, supporting emerging artists, hosting artist workshops and providing open call opportunities such as the Watchlist exposure.

Urban Arts Gallery (urbanartsgallery.org)
116 Rio Grande Street South, Salt Lake City, Utah


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Doctor’s Art Raises Addiction Awareness – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://grattage.info/doctors-art-raises-addiction-awareness-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:46:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/doctors-art-raises-addiction-awareness-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ [ad_1] Medford’s Dr. Arun Kuruvila raises awareness of the toll of addiction through his art, including the digital painting ‘Teardrops, Pills and Tablets’. Dr Arun Kuruvila of Medford has seen patients in their twenties undergo open-heart surgery to repair the damage caused by drug use. Bacteria from an infected drug injection site can enter the […]]]>

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Medford’s Dr. Arun Kuruvila raises awareness of the toll of addiction through his art, including the digital painting ‘Teardrops, Pills and Tablets’.

Dr Arun Kuruvila of Medford has seen patients in their twenties undergo open-heart surgery to repair the damage caused by drug use.

Bacteria from an infected drug injection site can enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart, where they infect the heart valves. Some infections can be cleared up with weeks of antibiotic treatment, but some people suffer damage so severe that their heart valves need to be surgically replaced.

“I’ve seen at least two or three patients who had a valve replaced, went home and came back with a second infection because they relapsed into their drug use and needed that valve replaced a second time. times,” Kuruvila said. “It’s a very high-risk extensive surgery. So crossing it twice is really difficult.

Kuruvila has witnessed the increase in the number of medical problems, hospitalizations and deaths caused by drug use. He not only helps care for patients at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center in Medford, but he also raises awareness about addiction and treatment through his art.

Born in India, Kuruvila excelled in art classes from fifth to eighth grade. He chose to go to medical school and eventually settled in Medford, but he continued to paint cityscapes, landscapes and abstract pieces. Later, he united his two passions by producing art based on his experiences in medicine.

More recently, Kuruvila has created a series of digital paintings that explore the toll of addiction while offering hope.

Dr. Arun Kuruvila works on a watercolor in his studio in Medford. [Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune]

A painting shows a close-up of an eye crying tears and pills, a reference to the addiction, suffering and death caused by prescription opioid painkillers and illegally manufactured pills containing the often deadly fentanyl.

Kuruvila said prescription drugs can ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce drug cravings, giving people a better chance of recovering from addiction and staying alive.

Giving people drugs for addiction treatment after a non-fatal overdose has a better track record of reducing deaths than prescribing blood pressure drugs after a heart attack, he said.

Regret, guilt and stigma keep many people from seeking treatment, but drug treatment is highly effective and life-saving, Kuruvila said.

Medford’s Dr. Arun Kuruvila raises awareness of addiction through his art, including “The High” digital painting.

Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center offers inpatient treatment to help patients recover. Patients can then log in to help further in the community.

Doctors recognize that patients are often more receptive to help after landing in hospital with a serious medical condition or from an overdose, Kuruvila said.

Her series of addiction paintings marks the second time that Kuruvila has drawn on her medical experiences to create art.

The COVID-19 pandemic prompted him to create a series of stark black and white paintings honoring the dedication and sacrifices of healthcare workers and showing the consequences for them and patients.

Dr. Arun Kuruvila’s art explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers and patients.

A painting shows a nurse providing hours of uninterrupted care to a COVID-19 patient on a ventilator on dialysis due to kidney damage. The nurse is fully equipped with personal protective equipment – ​​including face mask, face shield and medical gown – to minimize exposure to the virus.

“These dialysis nurses have to be in full PPE with their mask on, and they can’t leave the room,” Kuruvila said. “They are in an isolation room with the patient throughout dialysis. It’s very stressful. You cannot go in and out. They must stay with them.

Dr. Arun Kuruvila cares for patients at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center while raising awareness of medical issues through his art.

While working during the pandemic, Kuruvila said he saw seemingly healthy people who would suddenly get worse, have to go on a ventilator and then die. Some patients had to stay in hospital for more than a month because they needed high levels of supplemental oxygen. Staffing shortages, long working hours and fears of exposure to COVID-19 have created extreme levels of stress for healthcare workers.

Kuruvila’s COVID-19 series was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. This week, several of his healthcare-related paintings are on display at a gallery in Mumbai. He has shown a variety of his works locally and across America.

Dr. Erin Bender, a colleague who also treats patients at Asante’s Medford Hospital, said Kuruvila’s art captures the experience of healthcare workers and patients both during the COVID-19 pandemic and the drug epidemic in America.

“His paintings create awareness,” she said. “They’re really touching. You can relate to them visually. They show what you’ve been through and what the patients have been through. I’m in awe, not just because of his artwork, but because it’s a phenomenal doctor.

Contact Mail Tribune reporter Vickie Aldous at 541-776-4486 or valdous@rosebudmedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @VickieAldous.


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Baku Museum of Modern Art: the beating heart of Azerbaijan’s contemporary art scene https://grattage.info/baku-museum-of-modern-art-the-beating-heart-of-azerbaijans-contemporary-art-scene/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 15:03:43 +0000 https://grattage.info/baku-museum-of-modern-art-the-beating-heart-of-azerbaijans-contemporary-art-scene/ [ad_1] In recent years, modern art in Azerbaijan has experienced a kind of renaissance. Under Soviet rule and before the country’s independence, painters whose creations deviated from what was perceived as artistic orthodoxy were often repressed. The recent revival of this alternative art scene is partly due to Baku’s Museum of Modern Art, which houses […]]]>

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In recent years, modern art in Azerbaijan has experienced a kind of renaissance.

Under Soviet rule and before the country’s independence, painters whose creations deviated from what was perceived as artistic orthodoxy were often repressed.

The recent revival of this alternative art scene is partly due to Baku’s Museum of Modern Art, which houses many works by contemporary artists from the country, including Rasim Babayev.

“[Rasim Babayev] portrays people as they should not have appeared in Soviet society, in the Soviet Union,” art critic Dilara Vagabova told Euronews.

“In particular, at one of the exhibitions, the administration informed him that it could only be opened if he removed a number of his paintings. The artist said, ‘I will do it for the’ love of God. If some small works are a threat to such a powerful state as the Soviet Union, then let them be driven out'”.

Opened in the capital in 2009, the Baku Museum houses more than 800 works of avant-garde art.

The collection includes masterpieces by renowned artists from Azerbaijan, such as Sattar Bahlulzade, Boyukaga Mirzazade, Elmira Shakhtakhtinskaya and Tahir Salakhov.

Several important creations by Western artists are also on display, including Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso and Marc Chagall.

“Among the many works exhibited in our museum, the work of avant-garde artist Aida Makhmudova attracts a lot of attention from visitors,” art expert Lala Guliyeva told Euronews.

“She uses non-standard materials in her work, such as charcoal, epoxy resin and construction foam. This technique has a 3D effect”.

Built by French architect Jean Nouvel, the Museum of Modern Art’s unusual multidimensional design was inspired by Azerbaijani artist Altay Sadikh-zadeh.

A popular spot for art lovers and tourists, it is now one of the capital’s main cultural attractions.

Located in one of Baku’s liveliest districts, the museum is at the heart of Azerbaijan’s contemporary art scene which has found renewed vigor over the past decade.

For a well-known local artist, the museum and the surroundings of Baku are a constant source of inspiration.

“I spend a lot of time on the Caspian coast, one of the beaches just outside of Baku, watching the landscape change with the seasons,” said artist Batunay Hagverdiyev.

“So in the summer, local residents would build many temporary structures for those who want to come to the sea to rest. When the summer is gone, nature claims them and I depict in my painting the effect of human presence in the wild without showing humans,” he added.

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Makeover inside Huckleberry House helps at-risk teens https://grattage.info/makeover-inside-huckleberry-house-helps-at-risk-teens/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 22:24:00 +0000 https://grattage.info/makeover-inside-huckleberry-house-helps-at-risk-teens/ [ad_1] COLUMBUS, Ohio – Huckleberry House is experienced in caring for at-risk and homeless youth in the Columbus community. This time, it is he who lends the hand. What do you want to know The second floor of Huckleberry House is getting a facelift by volunteers. The last renovations were made in the 1970s NARI […]]]>

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COLUMBUS, Ohio – Huckleberry House is experienced in caring for at-risk and homeless youth in the Columbus community. This time, it is he who lends the hand.


What do you want to know

  • The second floor of Huckleberry House is getting a facelift by volunteers. The last renovations were made in the 1970s
  • NARI brought together the volunteers. The team replaces the carpet, repaints the walls and adds an additional room
  • Huckleberry House Executive Director Sonya Thesing explains how the transformation will benefit at-risk youth
  • The renovation of the second floor is expected to be completed this week

The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) is redecorating the second floor of the building. The last renovations were made in the 70s.

The building had minor changes before, but nothing too major.

Since the 1970s, the second floor of Huckleberry House has been used as a dormitory space divided between boys and girls. The carpet was getting worn and the walls were bland until the team of volunteers intervened.

“I feel good about it. That’s all it really is,” said Jordan Perry, one of the volunteers brought on board by NARI.

Perry said a humble upbringing inspired him to help.

“I just know the struggles of what it’s like to be where you are, stuck in a bad position,” Perry said. “With my experience, both in painting and carpentry, I can make a difference.”

Volunteers work hard to make a difference. They replace the carpet with a uniform floor covering, add color to the walls and furnish an additional bedroom.

Once completed, at-risk adolescents will return to the home.

Huckleberry House executive director Sonya Thesing said the new space will be more than a nice change of scenery for these teenagers. Thesing said it would give teens space and quieter areas to talk with counsellors. The warm and inviting atmosphere will also serve children better at a time when many of them are looking for a safe place to stay.

“Ask for help,” Perry said. “This place is for that. Anyone who needs help and is at a young age comes to places like this. Don’t be afraid or feel like they won’t be not welcome. Ask for help. It’s plain and simple.”

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Fans of chef Jacques Pépin are loving this fun new take on chickens, art and travel https://grattage.info/fans-of-chef-jacques-pepin-are-loving-this-fun-new-take-on-chickens-art-and-travel/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 13:33:15 +0000 https://grattage.info/fans-of-chef-jacques-pepin-are-loving-this-fun-new-take-on-chickens-art-and-travel/ [ad_1] Jacques Pepin. © Tom Hopkins Iconic chef, culinary teacher extraordinaire, television and social media personality, prolific author and philanthropist, Jacques Pepin (87 next month) continues to amaze with her energy and artistry. The recent publication of his 31st book, The Art of Chicken: Paintings, Stories and Recipes from a Great Humble Bird Chef (published […]]]>

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Iconic chef, culinary teacher extraordinaire, television and social media personality, prolific author and philanthropist, Jacques Pepin (87 next month) continues to amaze with her energy and artistry. The recent publication of his 31st book, The Art of Chicken: Paintings, Stories and Recipes from a Great Humble Bird Chef (published by Harvest Books, an imprint of William Morrow / HarperCollins Publishers), is already a bestseller. The 228-page hardcover – an endearing look at Pepin’s accomplished life – features a treasure trove of chicken and egg recipes from around the world, which are described for readers not as a typical ingredient list, but more like stories, as though Pépin is by your side, in your house, suggesting to you, as a friend would informally, how to cook a favorite dish, like Arroz with Pollo or Southern Fried Chicken or Rooster in wine or The Best French Toast. Reading his written words, Pepin fans will likely also “hear” his soothing French-accented voice, which is perfectly recognizable from watching his KQED PBS-TV cooking series, as well as videos on Youtube and Facebook. His essays, seasoned with humorous and poignant anecdotes, shed light on Pépin’s leaps – from growing up in France, helping his mother in his family’s small village restaurant, then leaving home forever at 13 to do his apprenticeship. in the rigorous kitchens of renowned European restaurants; handle exciting and eye-opening jobs, such as personal chef to French President Charles de Gaulle; and move to the United States, continuing his award-winning professional trajectory. However, the main objective that makes it New book that stands out from all the others is the inclusion, for the first time, of almost 100 paintings by Pépin, some of which are presented underneath. To discover an attractive Forbes interview with him, go to Legendary chef Jacques Pépin, 86, on the joys of Thanksgiving, traveling, helping others and not slowing down. If you are interested in owning a Pépin art print or an original work of art, please visit here.

In The art of chicken‘s introduction, Pépin writes: “I haven’t been painting as long as I’ve been cooking, but it’s been more than half a century since I took a brush instead of a knife and started to find creative fulfillment in another way. About fifty years ago I started a tradition of writing down and saving dinner menus that we had at home. I illustrated my menus with whimsical representations of animals, flowers, fruits, vegetables, vines, landscapes. It was only after acquiring a thick pile of these memories that I realized that an unusually high percentage of my drawings depicted chickens, often in comical and playful poses. I reimagined birds parading as leeks, cabbages, pineapples, artichokes – wherever my brush took me. Time and time again I ended up painting chickens, and they were an endless source of inspiration for me. The resulting oil and acrylic canvases – expressive, insightful, vibrant and playful – are certainly feathers in Pépin’s hat.

The art of chicken unfolds 12 sparkling chapters. Pépin first launches into the theme of the book: “Proust had his madeleine, I have chickens. As a chef, I am impressed by the humble bird’s contributions to world cuisine. As an artist, I marvel at the iridescent colors and varied beauty of its plumage. And the little boy in me never tires of watching the social interactions and antics of chickens, whether they peck and scratch in American farmyards or along streets in developing countries. Whether I am in France, China, Italy, Spain, Africa, Mexico, Greece, Canada or here in the United States, the cockcrow at sunrise is a universal language that proclaims triumph light in the darkness… [It] records something peaceful and comforting, like the church bells ringing in the morning in France. I wake up in a friendly world.

Relax with stellar stories about his friendship with Julia Child and their popular TV program. Pepin and Child could never agree on the ideal way to roast a chicken, but they were in total agreement that “one of life’s greatest pleasures is a perfectly roasted chicken served with a deglazing sauce made from the brown bits left in the roasting pan. Other celebrity-rich chestnuts spice up the pages, like the surprising Best Chicken Salad, dreamed up by famed actor and comedian Danny Kaye.

“I was born and raised in Bresse, a region located about thirty-five kilometers northeast of Lyon, says Pépin. “In France, Bresse is also synonymous with [its] succulent chickens…as Bordeaux is with good wine. Besides being delicious, the hens in my native region are beautiful creatures, large with striking blue legs, shiny white feathers and bright red crests: blue White Red — the colors of the French flag.

“Discovering new foods helps you understand people, learn more about yourself and appreciate other cultures,” insists Pépin. “I have traveled all over the world, enjoying chicken recipes from America to Russia, from Italy to Africa. In my travels, I have always marveled at the power of food to bring people together.

“These recipes are made to speak to your imagination, to the poet who lies dormant in you”, thinks Pépin. “This book aims to make you dream of succulent dishes, happy memories, and the generosity of sharing your table….”

Hints of all kinds are woven into the middle of the text. On the subject of eggs (because how could he present a book on chickens and not include eggs?), Pépin recommends: “High quality eggs from hens fed a good diet and allowed to beat, run and scratch freely are well worth the high prices. they order. I frankly admit that I am normally a little stingy in the kitchen. My modesty comes both from the fact that I was a child of the war years and that I grew up in a restaurant run by my mother, who was able to make good food with few ingredients.Organic products are wonderful, but I will buy conventional products if they are fresh and at only half or a third of the price. Likewise, except for special occasions, I tend to prefer wines that are young and under twenty dollars a bottle over expensive wines. Grand Cru. That being said, when possible, don’t economize when buying eggs. Buy the best quality organic eggs possible. »

“Cooking for someone is the purest expression of love, and sharing food with friends or strangers is a great equalizer,” says Pépin, embracing a reminder particularly relevant for this Thanksgiving week. .

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William Shakespeare: only signed and dated image of the famous playwright hanging in the Yorkshire stately home https://grattage.info/william-shakespeare-only-signed-and-dated-image-of-the-famous-playwright-hanging-in-the-yorkshire-stately-home/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 10:24:07 +0000 https://grattage.info/william-shakespeare-only-signed-and-dated-image-of-the-famous-playwright-hanging-in-the-yorkshire-stately-home/ [ad_1] A portrait that hung in a Yorkshire stately home has been unveiled as the only signed and dated image of William Shakespeare painted during his lifetime. The portrait has been described as the forgotten face of Shakespeare waiting for centuries to be rediscovered. In art market jargon, it is the biggest ‘sleeper’ to ever […]]]>

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A portrait that hung in a Yorkshire stately home has been unveiled as the only signed and dated image of William Shakespeare painted during his lifetime.

The portrait has been described as the forgotten face of Shakespeare waiting for centuries to be rediscovered. In art market jargon, it is the biggest ‘sleeper’ to ever emerge and can be worth up to £10million when sold.

The painting is offered for sale by private treaty and interest is expected from around the world. The owner, who wishes to remain anonymous but is a retiree from the Midlands, hopes he will stay in the country.

Prior to 1975, the picture hung in the library of a stately home, Swinton Hall, in the north of England, once home to the Danby family, where it was still known as ‘Shakespeare’. Since then it has been in private hands and significant research has been undertaken which has revealed the artist and many connections to Shakespeare.

The portrait of William Shakespeare.

The painting is by Robert Peake (1551-1619), sergeant-painter to James I. It is dated 1608 and signed by the artist with his regular mark. The sitter’s age is recorded on the portrait as 44. William Shakespeare was 44 years old in 1608. There are many links between Shakespeare and Robert Peake.

Peake was a well-known and well-respected artist who was also commissioned by the Office of the Revels, the department of the Crown which oversaw the licensing and presentation of plays. He was also commissioned to paint sets in the Revels’ buildings, the Priory of St. John of Jerusalem in Clerkenwell, where the Revels’ master, Edmund Tilney, was based.

Tilney wrote that the Office “consists of a cupboard and several other rooms in which artificers may work (i.e. tailors, embroiderers, makers of goods, painters, draughtsmen of wire and carpenters), as well as a convenient place for rehearsals and the presentation of plays and other performances…’

It was at the Priory of Saint John that The Comedy of Errors, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet and Macbeth were rehearsed, performed and allowed to perform. Robert Peake worked in the same premises and at the same time as William Shakespeare rehearsed his plays.

Peake was regularly commissioned to paint the portraits of many high-ranking members of the Court and of Jacobean society. He was assisted by his son William and, later, by his grandson Robert. Peake also ran a commercial art studio and printing business from premises in Holburne Conduit. Shakespeare is known to have resided in the area. All available evidence suggests that Peake knew Shakespeare and would have been the natural choice for a portrait, whether commissioned by the playwright, by his patrons or his followers.

This view is supported by historian Mary Edmond, a scholar of Robert Peake and his family, who wrote in her essay New Light on Jacobean Painters (1976) about the daily lives of Shakespeare and playwright John Webster: … It must be more than likely that one or both playwrights sat on the Peakes’.

New evidence of the Peakes’ ties to Shakespeare has emerged in recent months. Among the many print commissions undertaken by the Peakes in the 1620s were engravings by Martin Droeshout, the artist responsible for the image of Shakespeare’s frontispiece which appears in the first folio of 1623 (produced seven years after Shakespeare’s death). Shakespeare). Droeshout’s engravings, printed by William Peake, are in the National Portrait Gallery and the British Museum.

This fact connects the only verifiable image of Shakespeare – the First Folio engraving – to the rediscovered portrait of Peake. Additionally, Shakespeare is depicted in both the engraving and the portrait wearing a doublet typical of the period, a garment befitting his status.

The portrait is described as being in very good condition and has been examined by the Courtauld Institute in London where the paint and pigments were subjected to extensive tests for age and authenticity.

Duncan Phillips, the writer and researcher of art and antiquities, who discovered the links between Robert Peake, Martin Droeshout and the history of the portrait, commented on the discovery: “There is more evidence for this portrait of Shakespeare than any other known painting by the playwright. It is a monogrammed and dated work by a portrait painter of serious status with connections to the artist who produced the first folio image. The picture has survived the past 400 years almost undamaged by wear and tear thanks to its ownership by a family of Shakespeare enthusiasts who hung it in their library.

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Q+A with Nolan Preece – Double Scoop https://grattage.info/qa-with-nolan-preece-double-scoop/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:45:19 +0000 https://grattage.info/qa-with-nolan-preece-double-scoop/ [ad_1] NOTolan Preece’s current exhibition at the Stremmel Gallery, Chemigram Landscapes: The West Reinvented, can be understood as a catalog of chemical textures, mobilized to imitate the natural environment. “Chemigram” is a term coined by Belgian artist Pierre Cordier, who knows and approved of Preece’s work. The method falls under “cameraless photography”: an image is […]]]>

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NOTolan Preece’s current exhibition at the Stremmel Gallery, Chemigram Landscapes: The West Reinvented, can be understood as a catalog of chemical textures, mobilized to imitate the natural environment. “Chemigram” is a term coined by Belgian artist Pierre Cordier, who knows and approved of Preece’s work. The method falls under “cameraless photography”: an image is produced by painting or manipulating chemicals on the surface of the photo paper, then subjecting the paper to a developing process in which the interaction between the chemicals and the emulsion leaves visible traces. For this body of work, Preece directs the process to materialize textures that mimic cracked mountainsides, winding trees, shivering water surfaces and, in one case, a soaring flock of birds, which seem to shard into origami as they leap through the air. .

The unique chemical agent used by Preece for the majority of these rooms was acrylic flooring. I didn’t think to ask him which brand does the best job of leaving a shiny, non-slip floor, but for art purposes he recommends First Street Super–Crylic.

“Swimming pool.” Image courtesy of Stremmel Gallery

It seems that for the photography without a camera that you made, there is a play between the abstraction which emerges from the chemical processes on the one hand, and the images (or the figuration) on the other hand.

I’m kind of considered a pioneer with the chemigram because I started with it in 1981. And running it through a bunch of different strings, I guess you could say, to get where I’m at am now. And this whole thing with acrylic floor finish is my discovery, or my invention, or whatever you want to call it.

I derived it from work in engraving [when I was teaching], or intaglio engraving, where we used the ground finish as a hard ground on the plate, to resist the acid when we etched the plate. One day in 2011, I decided to try putting some of it on a sheet of photo paper, and I was so surprised at what happened that I said, “I really something new here. My wife didn’t see me for three or four days.

I was trying everything I could, and I don’t know anyone else who works in this acrylic floor finish. I use any of those that contain acrylic – like Mop & Glo, Quick Shine, Pledge – there’s one I really like called First Street Super-Crylic. I’m trying to push the chemigram in as many different directions as possible right now. Of course, I get up in the years and would love to see how far I can take it.

“Yosemite”, Image courtesy of Stremmel Gallery

Explain to me the process of “Yosemite”– looks like the rock face and trees were created by a chemical photographic process, but the sky looks distinctly different.

[The rock face was] put there with a piece of PVC pipe, squirting it [with floor finish] and drawing it on the paper. And you can see where I may have stopped from time to time as I went through the paper, to create these crevices going down the rock.

Like using a squeegee.

Yes, you can use a puddle pusher, which is a glass rod with a handle, or you can use PVC pipe. I run it over the paper and it puts an even layer on it. Then it will start cracking in about 30 minutes to an hour.

I make trees on a separate sheet of paper and then glue them together in the picture I’m working on. But everything is only chemigram. There’s only the sky – sometimes I can find interesting clouds, but there are times when I have to do something else, with Photoshop.

Are they physically glued, or do you cut them out digitally, and ultimately your final project is a digital print that’s been pieced together in Photoshop?

I paste them using Photoshop, and each of these trees is a different layer that I can bring. I [decided] to decorate it with something other than a rock face – and so I started making trees. Trees are one of my recent inventions. I seem to be able to do it with a brush and one of those natural sponges. I can dip it into the floor finish and dab it on to make it look like a tree.

Now in this process, I hope you understand that it is necessary to go through developer and fixer, developer and fixer, back and forth, in photographic solutions to create the image. You can’t even see it [at first] on the sheet of paper. These floor finishes are clear. But once you first slip them into developer or fixer, depending on what you want to do, the image starts to show through all those cracks.

If you’ve ever done a black and white print, going developer, stopping the bath and fixing, then you kind of understand that I’m using them the way you’re not supposed to – putting them in the fixer and then put it in the developer.

“Summit.” Image courtesy of Stremmel Gallery

I am always interested in the transfers between artistic practices and scientific practices. I’m curious how you define experimentation, which is a word used in both the arts and the sciences, where there’s some overlap—but there are also distinctions.

Well, it’s a matter of trial and error, really. I’m going to do something, and I’ll say, well, if I adjust it this way…it’s kind of a scientific methodology. That’s how science works most of the time – you try something, it doesn’t work, but you see something in there that starts to work. And you go, well, if I keep going down this path, I’ll find what I’m looking for. It’s trial and error, and you don’t have to give up. I go through 10 sheets of paper, and there’s nothing in there.

My wife is a research scientist, and we talk about it a bit. You have some sort of hypothesis, and you’re actually trying to prove it.

One of the qualities of experimentation is failure, and failure tolerance is really important for scientists and artists.

Scientists regard failure as an important thing, because they have come to some kind of conclusion, and it is something that is important for future research. And maybe there’s something in there that deserves further investigation. Failure is not necessarily considered a bad thing.

Although at the end of the day, I’m sure if you showed up to Stremmel with 27 blank sheets, they’d give you a weird look.

Well, yes, you are absolutely right. I would have learned that I couldn’t make one.

“Strong.” Image courtesy of Stremmel Gallery

Your room Strongfor me, operates in a register other than the “Yosemite” a. In “Yosemite”, you engage these textures in ways that suggest figurative forms. And this one seems to exist at this level of abstraction if not pure, at least in a more abstract state.

It’s acrylic, again, on a piece of photo paper. I zoomed in on a small section of about 4×5 and enlarged it with the scan. That’s what I’m looking for – those little textural things. And then I really edited the colors in Photoshop.

I started making abstractions. But then, my agent in New York, we were trying to run the abstracts for a bunch of museums across the country, and they weren’t going very well. And she asked me to send her a picture for a Christmas card, and it was a landscape of what I had done. The phone kept ringing! We had all these museums that wanted me to do an exhibition, and I said, “Is that all I have to do, do a landscape?”

That’s where I am. I use the landscape as a vehicle for me to explore anywhere I want to go with the variety of different techniques.

I was wondering if you think there’s any irony in this method where you’re using this very industrial chemical process to create images, while you’re depicting a landscape that seems devoid of industrial processes.

I never thought too much about the industrial connection there, because a lot of painting mediums are industrial stuff anyway – acrylic is plastic.

There is a room in [the Stremmel show] that’s not a chemigram, that’s etching. I don’t like using this process because it’s a highly toxic chemistry – you have to have the window open and a fan blowing behind me to get it out of there. I’m getting more picky about what I use because of my age – these things can bring you down quickly, if you get the wrong toxicant. Acrylic is no problem. It emits no smoke. It is easy to work with.

You want to leave a legacy, but not too soon.

It’s true. I want to get as much out of it as possible.

Nolan Prece. Image courtesy of the artist.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Personal exhibition of Nolan Preece Chemigram Landscapes: The West Reinvented is on view at the Stremmel Gallery in Reno until December 23.

This article was funded by a grant from the City of Reno Arts + Culture Commission.

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